Your Feedback

Best Vocal Mic: Shure Mikrofon Check

Which vocal microphone is best for your voice?

If you are looking for a microphone for singing and speech, the SM58 is always a great choice! This microphone has been the absolute universal classic for the most diverse applications for decades - in particular live on stage, but also in the studio, this dynamic microphone is the benchmark. While the Shure SM58 does a super job as a universally applicable microphone, vocalists often also want a microphone that can bring out the individual character of their voice even better. It is worth taking a look at Shure's extensive product range, offering a wide range of microphones.

Shure Microphones – made for the stage

A legend exists; where in a Shure SM58 was run over by a trolley fully loaded with PA equipment while setting up the system. The singer then simply brushed the dust off his mic, connected the microphone cable and the SM58 worked perfectly. Certainly not a good idea to try yourself, but the robustness of the Shure SM58 is certainly unmatched. Shure microphones are generally considered to be robust and uncomplicated in terms of frequency response, sound and feedback - a feature that makes Shure microphones so popular with professional PA equipment distributors and musicians alike. Whether cable-bound or wireless - a Shure microphone is made for the stage. In addition to the classic handheld versions, our range also includes a large selection of hand-held transmitters and wireless systems..



Dynamic Microphones from Shure
in the Recording Studio

Dynamic Shure microphones are also standard in the recording studio, and recording engineers often prefer a handheld simply because live-sampled singers can feel more comfortable and deliver better performance when singing in studio environments. An insider tip is the Shure SM7B! The microphone was originally conceived as a speaker microphone and was them discovered by the studio recording scene as a microphone for guitar amplifiers or loud and rocking vocals. It is one of the rare dynamic large-diaphragm studio microphones.



Shure Vocal Microphones at a Glance

Find out which vocal microphone fits your voice best! The overview shows technical characteristics and features of various Shure vocal microphones, including dynamic microphones such as the BETA 58A, as well as condenser microphones, e.g. The BETA 87A or the KSM8, which is the first dual-diaphragm dynamic microphone to offer fantastic vocal performance thanks to Dual-Dyne technology.

SM58

Description The legend among singing microphones. It has a powerful, clear presence. For decades it has been the number 1 on stages around the world.
Microphone type Dynamic
Frequency response Contoured
Sound Powerful and clear.
RRP 109€

SM86

Description Robust condenser microphone. The voice is particularly precise in the high frequency range.
Microphone type Condensor
Frequency response Contoured
Sound Very precise.
RRP 205€

SM7B

Description Dynamic microphone for professional recording. Also very popular for guitar and bass amplifiers.
Microphone type Dynamic
Frequency response Contoured
Sound Clear, present and warm.
RRP 429€

BETA 58A

Description First class dynamic vocal microphone. Combines Shure's typical presence with more subtleties in sound and maximum feedback suppression.
Microphone type Dynamic
Frequency response Contoured
Sound Powerful and clear.
RRP 179€

BETA 87A

Description One of the most popular condenser microphones for speech and singing on stage. With super-cardioid characteristics for minimized feedback.
Microphone type Condensor
Frequency response Contoured
Sound Clear, detail rich and assertive.
RRP 319€

KSM8

Description The KSM8 Dualdyne Vocal Microphone is the first dynamic microphone equipped with two diaphragms, unmatched vocal reproduction.
Microphone type Dynamic
Frequency response Linear
Sound Neutral and extremely precise.
RRP 499€

KSM9

Description Premium-stage vocal microphone. High quality condenser capsule with switchable characteristics (cardioid, super-cardioid).
Microphone type Condensor
Frequency response Contoured
Sound Clear, natural and detail rich.
RRP 589€


Shure
(271)

Item-Nr.: PAH0000163-000

Available in our central warehouse
Available in Romford
£ 85.00
Shure
(4)

Item-Nr.: ACC0001374-000

Available in our central warehouse
£ 125.00
Shure
(157)

Item-Nr.: REC0000211-000

Available in our central warehouse
Available in Romford
£ 311.00
Shure
(89)

Item-Nr.: PAH0000169-000

Available in our central warehouse
£ 135.00
Shure
(4)

Item-Nr.: PAH0000170-000

Ordered, estimated to be in stock: Nov 9, 2021
£ 245.00
Shure
(3)

Item-Nr.: PAH0017750-000

Available in our central warehouse
£ 322.00
Shure

Item-Nr.: PAH0017751-000

Ordered, estimated to be in stock: Nov 6, 2021
£ 322.00
Shure
(1)

Item-Nr.: PAH0013322-000

Available in our central warehouse
£ 495.00
Shure
(2)

Item-Nr.: PAH0004658-000

available soon, estimated to be in stock: Nov 7, 2021
£ 499.00


Microphone Basics:

Dynamic vs. Condenser Microphone

The transducer is the real heart of the microphone. It has the task of converting acoustic sound waves into an electrical signal. In general, this is due to two different physical principles, and microphones can be classified into two major types:

Dynamic MicrophoneCondenser Microphone
Dynamic microphones are robust and can reproduce very high sound pressure. They are largely resistant to environmental influences such as humidity and temperature.. A supply voltage is always required to operate a condenser microphone. This is generally obtained from the phantom voltage of a mixing console or a battery inserted in the microphone. In principle, condenser microphones deliver a more detailed and more natural sound than their dynamic counter parts.



Linear vs. Contoured (adapted) Frequency Response

Linear vs. Contoured (adapted) Frequency Response

Linear Frequency ResponseContoured (adapted) Frequency Response
All frequencies in the audible range (20 Hz - 20 kHz) are reproduced loudly. This is particularly suitable for applications where the sound source is to be reproduced as faithfully as possible, in studio recordings for example. For many applications it is useful to reproduce certain frequencies more intensively. A contoured frequency response, for example, can give vocals more penetrating power, making it sound warmer and more brilliant.